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Aileen: The Life and Death of a Serial Killer
Aileen: The Life and Death of a Serial Killer
2003 | 1h 29m 46s | Crime
Aileen Wuornos was a highway prostitute convicted of killing six men in Florida between 1989 and 1990. Following up on his earlier film about her murders, Nick Broomfield returns to talk to Wurnos, now awaiting execution on death row. In a tragic inditement of the US justice system, Broomfield's interviews reveal an increasingly mentally unstable Wuornos, deemed by the State of Florida to be sound of mind – and therefore fit to execute.
Stop at Nothing: The Lance Armstrong Story
Stop at Nothing: The Lance Armstrong Story
2014-01-01 | 1h 40m 8s | Sport
Lance Armstrong was the most successful road cyclist of all time, winning 7 consecutive Tours de France and inspiring millions with his charity work after surviving testicular cancer. His fame brought him sponsorship deals worth millions and he became one of the sporting world's most dominant presences. Yet almost all his success depended upon doping. Getting away with it for so many years engendered a callous carelessness that brought everything crashing down. This film follows this collapse through interviews with those who uncovered, investigated and worked for Armstrong. A thorough examination of the biggest sporting scandal in our time.
Joe Leahy's Neighbors
Joe Leahy's Neighbors
1988 | 1h 30m | Documentary
The sequel to First Contact, this film follows Joe, the mixed-race son of Australian explorer Michael Leahy, in his rocky relationship with his indigenous neighbours. Raised in the highlands of Papua and educated in Europe, he owns a coffee plantation, on the edge of which filmmakers Connolly and Anderson lived for months, capturing the conflicting values of tribalism and capitalism.
A Cry From The Grave
A Cry From The Grave
1999-01-01 | 1h 44m 54s | Historic
Srebrenica, Bosnia, the world's first United Nations Safe Area, was the site of the worst case of genocide in Europe since World War II. In July 1995, the Bosnian Serb army staged a brutal takeover of the small, intimate spa town and its surrounding region. Over a period of five days, the Bosnian Serb soldiers separated Muslim families and systematically murdered over 7,000 men and boys in fields, schools, and warehouses. Leslie Woodhead’s compelling film includes previously unreleased footage and first-hand personal accounts of the 1995 Bosnian massacre.
Enemies of the People (The Journalist and the Mass Murderer)
Enemies of the People (The Journalist and the Mass Murderer)
2009-01-01 | 1h 33m 42s | Politics
The killings organised by the Khmer Rouge stand as one of the greatest crimes of the twentieth century. One of its key architects was Nuon Chea - Brother Number Two. In this film he and some of those involved in the day-to-day killing are interviewed, and the wider impact is examined. Members of director Thet Sambath’s family were killed, a fact he initially hides from Chea. When the filmmakers refused to make the rushes available in Chea's trial, citing journalistic responsibility to their source, the film became the subject of intense debate.
Warriors From The North
Warriors From The North
2015-01-01 | 58m 40s | War
There are Somali communities in all the Scandinavian nations, mostly made up of refugees from the civil war and their children. In the last few years, young men and boys born or raised in Europe have been returning to Somalia to fight for Al-Shabab, the Islamist militant group. This film explores the motivations and actions of these would-be holy warriors through interviews with ‘The Shadow’, an anonymous former member of a Copenhagen cell. What is it about European society that makes fighting, even committing a suicide bombing, attractive?
Return to Homs
Return to Homs
2013-01-01 | 1h 29m 51s | Conflict
Once celebrated as Syria’s second best goalkeeper, Abdul Baset Al-Sarout has fought the Assad regime since leading chants at street protests in 2011. Director Talal Derki follows Abdul and his friends over two years as the situation escalates and they transition into militia fighters and leaders. The film captures the immediacy of the fighting, the collapse of daily life into siege, and the chaotic nature of a civil war where inexperienced young men go toe-to-toe with soldiers and tanks, while trying to protect as much of their city as they can.
The Reluctant Revolutionary
The Reluctant Revolutionary
2012 | 44m 53s | politics
President Saleh ruled Yemen from 1978 to 2012, only being ousted through revolution. This film is an intimate portrait of Yemen as the revolution unfolds, told through the eyes of tour guide leader Kais - who, although an intelligent commentator, sits on the side-lines as protests erupt. Director Sean McAllister filmed over the course of a year, eventually ending up as the only western journalist left in the country as the regime crackdown intensified, and the film looks as the distorting effect this has. We see Kais's journey from pro-President to reluctant revolutionary, joining angry protesters in the increasingly bloody streets of Sana’a.
First to Fall
First to Fall
2014-01-01 | 52m 3s | Politics
Tarek and Hamid were students in Canada when the civil war to oust Muammar Gaddafi erupted in 2011. Both men returned to their home country to fight against the repressive dictator, despite neither having any experience of conflict. Once in Libya, their experiences diverge - Hamid is enthused by fighting for his home town, Misrata, quickly fitting in with the more experienced fighters. Tarek is warier and doesn’t adapt to his dangerous new world to the same degree. The film keeps the focus on these two men throughout the conflict, showing us two of the millions of individual stories created by the war.
Soldier Women: To See If I’m Smiling
Soldier Women: To See If I’m Smiling
2008-01-01 | 44m 50s | Political
Israel is the only country in the world with compulsory army service for women. Whilst in Israel this is taken as commonplace, the experiences of Israeli women soldiers are rarely heard. Six women share their experiences as soldiers in the occupied territories during the bloodiest period since the first Palestinian uprising. With impressive candour they talk about what they saw and what they did; the way they tried to make sense of this ‘other world’ and how they tried to reconcile their experiences with their sense of their usual selves, outside of army uniform. To See if I’m Smiling powerfully explores the way gender, ethics, power and moral responsibility interact in times of war.
Justice For Sale
Justice For Sale
2011-01-01 | 44m 59s | Politics
Maintaining an impartial legal system is vital for any country, but the huge issues facing the DR Congo have brought the judiciary into question. Human rights lawyer Claudine Tsongo sets out to overturn a rape conviction for a local man that she’s sure is wrongful; her methodical precision in getting to the truth exposes many of the issues in the Congolese legal system. Laws are ignored, bribes are rife, evidence is falsified. The role of international support and NGOs is looked at critically too - efforts and funds to deal with the country's rape crisis have led to overly hasty convictions.
First Contact
First Contact
1982 | 58m | Documentary
When Columbus and Cortez ventured into the New World, there was no technology to record the drama of this first encounter. But, in 1930, when the Leahy brothers penetrated the interior of Papua New Guinea in search of gold, they carried a movie camera. Thus, they captured on film their unexpected confrontation with indigenous communities. This amazing footage is at the center First Contact. Fifty years later some of the participants are still alive and vividly recall their first encounter with the outsiders. The Papuans recount how they believed the white men to be their ancestors, bleached by the sun and returned from the dead. When shown their younger, innocent selves in the found footage, they recall the darker side of their relationship with these mysterious beings.
The Condemned
The Condemned
2013 | 1h 20m | Documentary
In the heart of Russia, in a forest larger than Germany 7 hours from the nearest city, and where winter temperatures drop to -40 degrees, lies a prison like no other. Holding 260 men collectively responsible for nearly 800 murders, Penal Colony 56 is unique: a prison exclusively for killers.
The Law of The Jungle
The Law of The Jungle
2012-01-01 | 51m 59s | Crime
In Peru, the oil industry is mostly outsourced to foreign companies. In the rainforest oil fields, the indigenous population is increasingly persecuted and confrontation with companies and police occurs frequently. After a policeman is killed at a peaceful protest, various indigenous campaigners are arrested on murder charges. One of their leaders, Fachin, contacts a leading defence lawyer who specialises in indigenous cases, in an effort to challenge the normal routine of unjust imprisonment. The film also considers the effect of the camera - is the case and the possible verdict changed by the filmmaker's presence, especially with a foreign crew?
Disappeared By The IRA
Disappeared By The IRA
2013-01-01 | 1h 24m 37s | Politics
During The Troubles in Northern Ireland, at least 15 people were ‘disappeared’ - abducted at night - by the Irish Republican Army. Political enemies, people viewed as traitors and suspected informants were taken with no word sent to their families. Executed and then buried in bogs, beaches and forests, some victims' remains have still to be found. In many cases, the identities of the killers and those who commanded them remain unconfirmed. The film takes a close look at the case of Jean McConville, a suspected informant murdered in 1972, and the impact her killing had on her ten children.
Touched By Murder
Touched By Murder
2016 | 16m | Documentary
Following the discovery of a young Polish woman’s corpse left in a suitcase on a London canal, residents of the adjacent building share their reactions. While some remain indifferent or ignorant of the details, others are more deeply affected. For one woman, who shares the victim’s nationality, the story hits a little too close to home. Another resident, who has survived assault, finds the events triggering. Marc Isaacs intimately captures the aftermath of a horrific event in a diverse community.
Soldiers Who Rape
Soldiers Who Rape
2009-01-01 | 45m 4s | Politics
Human Rights Watch has described eastern Kivu, crucible of the conflict in the DR Congo, as the worst place in the world to be a woman or child. Rape is endemic on all sides of the conflict. At times extremely shocking, this film attempts to discover why rape is seen as a normal weapon of war and contains interviews with multiple soldiers who have committed sexual assaults. Their reasons for their crimes are manifold: to cause terror, to shame the government they are fighting against, as a way of attacking the men they're fighting and because the breakdown of society simply means they can.
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